Database Name: dbwzecoixet92g fit dad nation – A Dad’s Path

Transcript: #39- Fit Dad Nation

 


Summer is coming and with that means swimsuit season! So who better to speak with than Steve Roy, founder of Fit Dad Nation. Fit Dad Nation is for dads who want “a place to learn more about how to get fit (again), become healthier, get their mojo back, and are looking to become the best versions of themselves.

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, or on your favorite podcast platform. Like this episode? Check out more of our Dad Podcasts.


Will, A Dad’s Path:

Hi and welcome. Today, we’ve got a very special guest. We’re here with Steve Roy from Fit Dad Nation. Steve has an inspiring story here going from divorce and out of shape to claiming his life, but I’ll let him tell that. You can find Steve on Instagram @thefitdadnation and on his Facebook group at fitdadnation.com/community. Thank you for joining us, Steve, and welcome.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Hey, thanks, Will. I appreciate it. Glad to be here.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

If you could start by sharing the story of where Fit Dad Nation came from?.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Yeah, yeah, sure. So I actually didn’t start as the Fit Dad Nation. Back in 2010, I was married. I had two little girls and I was working corporate America. I had a job as a financial advisor for a large brokerage firm, which I hated. You get one of those jobs, it just sucks the life out of you. You go in, everything that you’re doing it just against everything that you want to do with your life. And that’s how I felt. And I did it for 11 and a half years.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

So at this time, it was 2010, really miserable in my career and my marriage was really, really struggling. And so I started a website. It wasn’t fitness related. It was about me sharing my journey of how am I going to get out of the nine to five? And I started just writing articles every day. Actually I was at work and I was so angry and frustrated that I started writing just from the heart and it just blew up.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I had tons of visitors and people could really resonate with the message and that started kind of my online writing, creating an online business. So I ended up getting separated in the winter of 2012. Still stayed at my job.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Obviously, you guys, you can imagine if anybody’s ever been through a divorce, you know it’s brutal, especially with two little girls, they were seven and four at the time, obviously extremely emotional, very difficult time. I moved out of the house. I started over, had pretty much nothing. And I stayed at my job for, I guess, close to a year. And I was just struggling, just struggling.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

As you can imagine, with so many negative emotions from being away from my kids, I only had them on the weekends, and I was so used to being with them every day, missing them terribly, showing up to a job I hated, coming home to an empty apartment was really depressing. And I decided to self-medicate with food and not alcohol, not drugs, nothing like that, but I just said, “Screw it.” And I just started eating whatever and anything I wanted. And I did that. I literally would go to McDonald’s twice a day, just sit in my car and gorge and gorge and gorge.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

And after about six, seven months of this, my body just started to just deteriorate. I felt horrible all the time. I’d get my kids on the weekends and I had no energy. I didn’t want to do anything because I was so tired. It was just no way to live. And I had this chance meeting with an old friend at a bar one night and we got to talking and she just laid into me about how I was just doing my daughters such a disservice by being so miserable, so negative, beating myself down and it really kind of lit the spark to, “You know what? I have to do something else.”

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

So I thought about it and started making some physical changes right away. I started changing my diet and a few months later I bumped into her again, it was maybe three or four months later I forgot now, but I saw her and she was like, “Oh my God, you’re not even the same person anymore.” I had changed so much.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

At that time, actually we started to date after that, it was just kind of this crazy situation. She had just gotten divorced. I was divorced and we got to talking and she’s like, “You have something inside. You have to do something.” I had been a personal trainer for many years, actually since 1997, I was always doing some kind of personal training, teaching boot camps, whatever. And she’s like, “You need to do something in that space. Share your passions. You’re miserable at work.”

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

So I ended up spending couple of months trying to figure out how the heck can I go from making pretty good salary and bonuses and everything as a financial advisor for a large brokerage firm to doing something else, whether it’s online working at a gym. And I ended up taking a job at a gym, running a gym, it was a small functional training center, which I did for five months, struggled, immensely financially. And I was busting my butt, literally, up at five to teach bootcamps. I worked nine or 10 hour shifts and I still was making about maybe 60% of what I had been making. So I was struggling to make ends meet that way too.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I lost 25 pounds just because I couldn’t keep weight on. I was so busy all the time. I wasn’t eating much and I didn’t look very good. I didn’t feel very good. And I ended up saying, “You know what? I got to get out of the situation.” And decided that I was going to take my passion for fitness, my passion for wanting to be working online, controlling my own schedule, not working for somebody which I had been doing and started a website.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

It was actually called Single Dad, Fit Dad. It was a play on Rich Dad, Poor Dad. So I was a single dad. I was getting back into it and I said, “There’s a lot of single dads that have the same problems that I do that are going through all these emotional problems. They struggle financially and physically.” And so I started this website and started reaching out and hired some coaches, hired some copywriters, people to help me, marketing people and spent about a year doing that.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I loved doing it. I met a lot of great guys, built up an email. Built up a community in Facebook. It was maybe five or six, 7,000 people on Facebook and a bunch of people on Instagram and it was going well.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

And I remember I hired this guy who was a recommendation, supposedly, to be this really phenomenal marketer. I’m like, “Okay, this guy is going to take my business to the next level.” Paid him $3,000 for two weeks and all we did was talk once a day. He would send me emails to send out and I would send out the emails. And after three weeks I had made zero money, zero.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

So I called him and I said, “Dude, what’s going on here?” And he said, “Listen, man, I’ve looked at everything. We’ve tried these things. I’ve kind of done my work and you’re going to starve to death, trying to make a living from Single Dads. It’s not a niche that’s going to be profitable. These are great guys. You want to help them. But many of them are not in a position financially and emotionally to invest in themselves. They’re not there. You want to help them, but you are going broke.”

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

And I was. I was spending a bunch of money making very little. And so I rebranded, Fit Dad Nation, started over from scratch, which was really difficult and basically started over and decided to start speaking to mostly middle-aged dads. I’m 50 right now. So back then it was whatever eight years ago, a lot of middle-aged guys, like you and I, carry a lot of extra weight. We put ourselves last and that’s kind of where it started. So once I rebranded again, started over from scratch, and just went all in on it and I’ve been doing it ever since.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

And it’s really truly been the best thing I could have ever done. It’s not like this windfall of cash that’s motivating me. It’s I’m getting to connect with a lot of guys really around the world that are struggling. A lot of them are struggling in different ways. And you know, I feel like it’s my job to help them. It’s been awesome. I just absolutely love it.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

That is great. What an inspiring story. I’m always interested in change, when you have those inflection moments or point in time you say, “Ah, I just can’t take it anymore.” To your point you’re unhappy at your job for, it wasn’t three months, not six months, not a year, for a while and then something changed. Something caused you to finally say, “Hey enough is enough. I’m leaving.” Do you remember was that a particular moment? Do you remember that moment?

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I’ll share this. This was crazy. I worked for this guy, I hope he doesn’t listen to the show, but I worked for this guy at the last company I worked with and it was just him and I. We were partners and he was an a-hole. There’s no doubt about it. He was just not a great guy. Great businessman, as far as creating a profitable business, we had a big book of business, lots of clients, but we had another coworker who was, I think he was maybe, he was in his mid 40’s, and he was a great guy. Everybody liked him.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I remember one Friday we left the office, said goodbye, came in Monday, and he wasn’t there. And I’m like, “Where’s Wes?” His name was Wes. And someone came in and they’re like, “He went in for surgery this weekend and died.” He died on the table. So we’re all, this was very upsetting. And this guy that I worked with his first response was, “Well, who’s going to cover his share of the expenses for this office?” And I’m like, “This is ridiculous. I cannot be part of this.”

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

That mentality, you see so much in that industry, it’s just money, money, money, in that industry. And I’m not money motivated and never have been. And that comes to mind and I’m like, “That’s it.” But no, what really was the end of it was when I got divorced split up.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

And the only reason I had stayed in my job for so long was because now ex-wife didn’t work. She stayed home with the kids. So I didn’t have necessarily the option to go, “Hey, I want to go try something else.” I was making six figures and she got to stay home and we had a nice house, the SUVs, all that stuff. But I was miserable across the board. And so once that relationship ended, I said, “You know what? I don’t care if I have to work 16 hours a day, I’m going for it.” And I did.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Luckily so far it worked out, but I had my share of struggles. Many, many, many difficult months, even where I didn’t think I’d be able to pay the bills or does this even make sense? Does anybody care about what I’m doing? Those whole conversations, but yeah, it’s been eight years.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

Wow. Yeah. So it sounds like there were a couple eye opening moments there and that’s sometimes what it takes though. And you brought something up really interesting too, as someone who’s recently single may not have the financial wherewithal, the sort of emotional wherewithal, or just even the want to invest in themselves. And that’s what you’re saying when you’re talking to your friend and then she said, “Hey, this is not about you. You’re doing it as service to your kids.”

Will, A Dad’s Path:

Because when you’re depressed, when you’re feeling lazy, that’s what you’re putting out to your kids. So I guess the question I ask you, Steve, is what would you say to someone like that? How do you reach someone like that?

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I like to sum it up in a way, and I always tell people, and I think maybe you have even mentioned this as well, but I tell my guys, “If you can’t even take care of yourself, how can you take care of your family the best way possible?” You can’t. And I share my experience many times of I was not even close to being the best dad I could be because I felt like crap all the time.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I didn’t have the energy to take them out and do stuff with them and have experiences with them. Because I was just abusing my body. I wasn’t exercising. I was eating fast food and junk and Red Bulls, tons of soda. And that’s what I try to remind these guys of, if you’re going through your life, which to this day, half the guys in my group are this way, they put themselves last, they eat whatever’s in front of them. They say they don’t have time. They don’t know what to do. They don’t have motivation. They can’t stick with it.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

All those same excuses are always there and they slowly get fatter and fatter and fatter over the years. And one day they wake up, they’ve got 40 pounds of fat and they’re like, “Never going to get out of this body.” Tired all the time. They want to get home and sit down on in front of the TV. They don’t want to do fun, exciting stuff that their kids should be experiencing and it’s not serving them at all. And they’re never going to get that back. And literally they’re going to wake up one day and it will be too late.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

They’re going to wake up and they’re going to be 65 and they’re not going to be mobile at all. They’re going to feel terrible, posture terrible, everything’s tight and weak. And you’re not going to be able to do those things. Plus your kids are going to be gone on top of that and it’s too late.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

And so I think about those things every day. It truly drives me. So I’ve been with this woman that I told you about. We just started dating. We’ve been together for, I guess almost nine years now, and almost everything we do is experiences. She lives a healthy lifestyle, I do too. And now my girls are 16 and 13 and we’ve done so many things. That’s what it’s about.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

It’s not about going out and, “Let’s go shopping.” It’s, “Let’s do something that you’ll remember in 20 years from now.” And have the energy to do that is absolutely critical. I’m not getting any younger. I know I’m 50 years old. Things are starting to break down that I’ve used for a long time and I feel it. And so I want to take advantage of while I still am in pretty good health. We do these things. It’s just so important to me.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I just shared this on social and we started the new challenge actually today, but I had injured my foot a few months ago, playing pickleball, tore the ligament in my foot, and I allowed that to kind of just suck me down. I was playing pickleball three to six hours every day. I was addicted and I got pretty good at it, starting to play tournaments and stuff like that, and then this thing happened and it totally derailed. My day to day schedule was built around pickleball. How can I play pickleball today?

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

And if you haven’t played, you have to try. It’s literally the most fun you’ve ever had. And so I let this injury kind of suck me down and I put it on 15, 20 pounds, started to just mope around. And I noticed a big difference in what I was doing with the kids, how engaged I was. I was looking at my phone instead of wanting to go do stuff with them, go outside, whatever.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

It just wasn’t the right thing to do for my girls. And I’ve had to really call myself out on my own BS to stop that because it’s easy, you probably know. You got a bunch of junk food in the house, you’re going to eat it. We’ve got Fig Newton’s, Pop-Tarts up there, Krispy Kreme, it’s hard not to eat it. And once you get in that cycle, it’s really hard to get out. And so that’s why you have to dig deep and realize, “Okay, I need to make a change, not just for me, but for my family.”

Will, A Dad’s Path:

And sometimes it’s not the motivator. Sometimes the motivator for a guy is, “I want to look good with my shirt off. I want my wife to find me far more attractive. I want better sex with my wife.” Those are important too. It’s not just, “I want to be better for my kids.”Because sometimes that doesn’t motivate a guy. It’s something could be aesthetic. Maybe they were the fat guy or the fat kid and they want desperately to have the body that they’ve always dreamed of. Or they want to be able to do 50 pushups or three or five pull ups or something like that that’s important to them for whatever reason, emotional reason.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

And you have to find that. You literally have to find that emotional reason. Otherwise, you’re not going to do it because it’s too hard. You’re caught up in your day to day, you’re in your routine, you are not going to shake up your entire life for something that you’re not absolutely committed to. It’s just not going to happen. We’re too busy. And so you have to find that. And that’s a hard thing for a lot of guys. They’re not going to take the time to reflect and think, “What do I want, but why do I want to do this?” They don’t. Too busy, bouncing around, doing stuff from work, home, blah, blah, blah. And they never take the time. And then they wake up and it’s 10 years later and they haven’t done anything. And now they’re 20 pounds heavier and 10 years older and it’s going to be that much harder to do it.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

No, totally. And I think that’s a lot of our sort of fears, just getting motivated, understanding what’s motivate you. It doesn’t have to be one thing either, right? Different things motivate different people. And the other thing I found really helpful is accountability, which can go on a lot of different levels, whether it’s a men’s group or a buddy, or just having someone you can talk to who has a similar goal to keep each other honest.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

That’s really, to me, the secret sauce in all of this, and I stopped pretty much doing anything one on one, I have a few clients here and there, but I do virtually everything in groups, smaller groups, big groups, groups of four, groups of 10, whatever. And I always make sure that it’s accountability based because guys will show up for something that’s bigger than themselves.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Literally, they’ll show up for the other guy, not for themselves. If it was just for them, they’d say, “Screw it.” But because they know these guys are watching and they’re counting on them, they’re going to show up. And that’s huge.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

So the challenge we’re starting today is accountability based. We’ve got a spreadsheet in the group every day they log in, we can all see, “Is this guy doing the work?” They’re posting photos. They’re posting their measurements. They’re getting uncomfortable. They’re putting their butts on the line and that’s going to be that little thing that may keep them going when otherwise they would just quit or disappear.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Because it’s so easy to disappear online. You just hide behind your Facebook account and can’t reach them. They’re not going to return your messages. They don’t show up on Facebook. What are you going to do? It happens all the time. All the time. Guys pay me all the time and then disappears. Just easier. They go back into their comfort zones and like, “Oh, well it wasn’t for me.”

Will, A Dad’s Path:

And you’re right. The money is not the issue. They’ll spend the money, they won’t care about themselves, but the second they’re letting someone else down, that’s huge.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Yep. It’s huge. Accountability is huge.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

I’d actually like diving into the weeds, just to get practical for a second here, talk about kids, food, and temptation. That’s something that I struggle with when I was living alone, I just simply wouldn’t have the food. I didn’t have Pop-Tarts. I didn’t have Krispy Kreme and it solved a lot of the problems, but now it’s not my choice. So what do you do? What’s your philosophy there? Do you have some ideas that can maybe help me or some of other listeners?

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I don’t think it’s realistic. It’s just not true if, “Well, we all eat organic foods and we eat fresh fruits and vegetables.” And in theory, yes, you want your kids to eat all of those things. Nobody wants their kids to grow up on chicken nuggets and frozen pizzas and stuff like that. The fact is that life is hectic and it’s not always a realistic thing to always be shopping, cooking, preparing it’s so much work, and I’m not saying that it’s not worth it, but for the vast majority of us, it’s just not going to happen.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Whether you plan for it or not. Even me as a fitness coach been doing this forever, it’s just not happening. My youngest is extremely picky. So that makes it difficult. A lot of people have very picky eaters and yeah, to be honest with you, we’re not married now, we’ve we just never decided to get married, but she has a massive sweet tooth. And on top of that, she’s an enabler who wants to make me happy. And she knows the Pop-Tarts make me happy.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

So despite knowing that I’m trying to take care of myself, she wants me to feel good. So she’ll bring Pop-Tarts in. And then of course it’s on me to either eat them or not, which I have been. So, we kind of do our best with the kids. We have our share of good food and we have our share of junk food. We steer them in the right directions and we’re not going to junk out.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

And something I’ll tell the guys which can come in handy, but for them personally, if it’s not in their house, they can’t eat it. And one other thing I do is, for me, I’ll put all of my stuff on one shelf and I just literally will tell myself, I cannot eat anything off of this shelf.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I think for a lot of guys, if they truly truly commit to something like this, it’s not that hard. It’s when you’re kind of on the fence and you’re like, “Oh, I really want to do this, but I don’t know if I can.” You’re going to be lured and tempted by that stuff. Especially when the triggers hit you late at night or whatever, there’s something going to hit you.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

For me it’s 10:00 at night, I want cheese and crackers. I’ll eat a whole block of cheese and Triscuits, just sit in my stomach. But starting today, and I’ve gone through this many times over the years, once I commit to something and I’m committing to my guys, publicly, I’ve shared my struggles, that’s it. I want to lead by example. And to me, there’s no options.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

We’ve got a whole refrigerator full of leftover Chinese food, white pizza from last night before the challenge started, I’m not even interested. I’m not even going to look at it. I’m not even going to think about it.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

But I’m not going to tell the guys listening, “Only buy the good stuff and make sure your kids are only eating…” Have them have a vegetable with every meal, steer them towards better foods and just cook for them. Kids aren’t going to sit down and cook for themselves. It’s on you. And most parents, in my experience, are going to take path of least resistance, which is throw something in the microwave, throw something in a pot like pasta. And then maybe once or twice a week, they’ll sit down and make meatloaf or chicken or whatever.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I just say, “Honestly, there’s no hack for that.” Unless you’re living super, super clean, which in my experience, very few people are living like that. You just have to do the best you can. And if you don’t buy it’s not going to come into your house and you can’t eat it. Which is why I tell all my guys don’t go shopping when you’re hungry. It’s just a bad idea. And that’s it.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I don’t have any hacks. I don’t have any secret things to tell anybody. I’m much more of a realist. I’m not a David Goggins where doesn’t matter what is in my face, I’m just going to rise to the occasion and do whatever I have to do. Most people don’t live like that nor do I. That’s really what I can tell you.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

Right. And we all fall down, so to speak. So as long as we get back up that’s kind of the key. Snacking late night is often an issue with me. So that rule you just said, if you have food on this shelf, you can’t eat it, to me, that’s helpful. So yeah, I’m going to try that. And like you said, you can’t order McDonald’s for yourself and then make your kids a healthy meal.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

We say that all the time here at A Dad’s Path, “Kids don’t care what you say. They care what you do.”

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Yeah. They’re not listening to you, they’re watching you. Sometimes, and I’ve seen this work, is you put yourself on the line with your own family and say, “Listen, guys, this is what I’m doing. I’m not going to ask you to do this challenge with me or clean up your diet like I want to do. But if you see me eating something, that’s not on my list. Here, you get X, Y, or Z.” whatever it is, no chores, or you get a $5 bill or whatever it is. Same with your spouse. Same thing, “Listen, I need you to hold me accountable. If you don’t eat this way, that’s okay. But if you see me drinking a soda, if you see me, whatever, this is the consequence and I want you to hold me to it.” And that does work.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

Oh, I love that idea. Because a lot of people, a lot of dads, are saying, ” don’t have a friend group right now. I don’t have the support structure I want.” And that’s what we’re trying to bring out there, Steve, you and I here. And family’s a great place to get that kind of accountability too, a 100%.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

I was going to say your kids, they love that kind of stuff. They can catch daddy doing something bad. Oh man. They won’t forget that. So that’s another great way to broach it, I think.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Oh, they do. And I will just say that for someone like you, you said you struggle at night like I did, we’ve done these challenges in the past. And actually they’re really effective is we just make something as super simple, as intermittent fasting challenge, which is all right for the next 30 days. You’re not going to eat between 8:00 at night and 10:00 in the morning. That’s it. That’s all you’re doing.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

And you’ll find that within a few days of, “Oh my goodness, this sucks because I can’t eat the foods I want at 10:00 at night.” You’re not even hungry. You’re literally not hungry anymore because it’s psychological. You’re not physically hungry at 10:00 at night, but your mind says, “Okay, I’m winding down. I’m washing Netflix. I need to have pretzels and dip.” Or whatever it is and you want it and you eat it, typically way too much. And it just affects your sleep, all that other stuff.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

But once you block off that time and tell yourself, “Okay, that’s my only change.” We use it quite a bit in different challenges as a tool and it works, literally within a few days, you will not be hungry anymore. You’re like, “This is great. I’m sleeping better. I’m saving myself five, 600 calories a day at least. And I’m losing weight because of it.”

Will, A Dad’s Path:

Yeah, wow. That’s another great challenge or sort of rule to bring yourself. And a lot of time, I think there’s lower hanging fruit. I think lower than we expect, easier ways to have some initial gains in whatever it is, whether it’s strength training, diet, parenting, where it may seem like an insurmountable goal if you’re looking way in the future, but hearing your story, Steve, it’s really inspiring. It shows that it’s not. And I appreciate you sharing with us and joining us today.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

Again, you can find Steve on Instagram @thefitdadnation and on his Facebook group, fitdaddnation.com/community. We talked about accountability today. We talked about inner circles. Steve has an inner circle called Fit Dad Nation Inner Circle, fdnic.com, is that right, Steve?

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Yes, sir. You got it.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

All right. Well, excellent. Until next time thanks very much for joining us. Any other closing thoughts for us?

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

I have so many, but I’ll just expand on what you just said. So many guys that I speak to feel like there’s too much to do and therefore they do nothing because it’s too overwhelming. I have to clean up my diet. I have to start a whole new program. I have to change my lifestyle. I have to drink more water. I have to eat less. There’s so many things that literally they’re paralyzed and they just stop. And I’ll just say that just by making one small change every day, I have a motto of, “One day better.”

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Do one small thing that makes you better. Whether it’s literally going from three sodas to two for a week. It’s skipping that extra side of ranch or just something small. And those little things do add up. And I started very slowly when I was getting back into it years ago and just built on it every single day. I literally was trying to run and I would last five minutes and I’d be exhausted and then within a few weeks I was running for 15 minutes and then I got back into the gym and then it just snowballed. And you just have to think of it like that.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Don’t try to take everything down, because there’s so much information out there, it’s very confusing. Just do one small thing that you know is better for you. You don’t have to get it all right. Just do one thing that helping you, it’s not making you healthy or it’s making you worse, just remove that one small thing and just build on it.

Will, A Dad’s Path:

I love that. Each little thing leads to big things, a 100%. That’s just, how you said, it snowballs. Thanks again for joining us, Steve. And until next time we will see you soon.

Steve, Fit Dad Nation:

Sounds good. Thanks, Will.

0